SF Symphony announces new summer series at Frost Amphitheater, Presented by Stanford Live

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ANNOUNCES NEW SUMMER SERIES
AT FROST AMPHITHEATER PRESENTED BY STANFORD LIVE
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SF Symphony to perform first classical concerts in the
newly-renovated Frost Amphitheater at Stanford University
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Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas leads the SFS in inaugural series performance; concert features music by Tchaikovsky and violinist Gil Shaham, July 10
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Conductor Gemma New leads the SFS in concerts featuring
Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, July 13 and 14
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Ticket pre-sale February 19 for SFS donors and subscribers;
tickets on sale to the general public February 26 at sfsymphony.org/frost and (415) 864-6000
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A rendering of a future performance in the renovated Frost Amphitheater (Rendering courtesy of CAW Architects)
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SAN FRANCISCO, CA — The San Francisco Symphony (SFS) announces a new partnership with Stanford University to present an annual series of concerts in the newly-renovated Frost Amphitheater on the Stanford campus. The series—SF Symphony at Frost, Presented by Stanford Live—kicks off this summer with three performances, July 10, 13 and 14, 2019. San Francisco Symphony Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas leads the SFS in the inaugural series concert on Wednesday, July 10 —an all-Tchaikovsky concert featuring the composer’s Symphony No. 4 and Violin Concerto, performed by American violinist Gil Shaham. On Saturday, July 13 and Sunday, July 14, New Zealand-born conductor Gemma New leads the SFS in a program featuring Beethoven’s beloved Symphony No. 9.
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Frost Amphitheater on the campus of Stanford University will reopen in the spring of 2019 after an extensive renovation to the treasured 1937 open air facility. It begins its new era with a diverse lineup of concerts and events presented by Stanford Live, with the San Francisco Symphony as its presenter of classical music.
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“The San Francisco Symphony is thrilled to strengthen our relationship with Stanford University as we begin our first season in the beautiful and beloved Frost Amphitheater,” said Symphony President and Stanford Alumna Sakurako Fisher. “Our Orchestra has a great history at Frost and this series serves as a wonderful opportunity for the broader Bay Area community to, once again, enjoy our music under the sun and stars in this historic tree-lined bowl. We also hope our unique partnership will allow an even greater exchange of musical ideas through new creative and academic partnerships with Stanford as it continues to carry and lead in the balancing of the arts with the sciences.”
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The San Francisco Symphony’s relationship with the Stanford University community has been a long and fruitful one. In 1913, only two years after its founding, the SFS performed its first concert for Stanford students in Assembly Hall. The SF Symphony made its debut at Stanford’s Frost Amphitheater four years after its opening, as part of Stanford’s 50th Anniversary Celebration in 1941, with Music Director Pierre Monteux conducting. For more than a decade in the 1960’s–70’s, the Symphony performed a benefit concert at Frost Amphitheater every summer, conducted by the legendary Arthur Fiedler. Most recently, the San Francisco Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas were featured in the celebratory Grand Opening concert of Bing Concert Hall in January 2013.
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“We have found a wonderful collaborator in the San Francisco Symphony,” said Chris Lorway, Executive Director of Stanford Live/Bing Concert Hall. “They are committed to bringing the highest level of musical experiences to audiences which aligns beautifully with our mandate at Stanford Live. These annual concerts will also provide Stanford an opportunity to engage further with the local community as we collectively build Frost into the preeminent outdoor music venue on the Peninsula.”
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SF Symphony Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas added, “Music has a unique and powerful way of connecting us, inspiring us, and building community. We are incredibly happy that we can broaden our musical community even further with the combination of the wonderful setting of the Frost Amphitheater and the fantastic musicians of the San Francisco Symphony. We so look forward to bringing our exciting style of music making to the campus of Stanford University.”
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SF Symphony at Frost Amphitheater June 20, 1941 (Photograph courtesy of Stanford University)
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About the San Francisco Symphony
The San Francisco Symphony (SFS) is widely considered to be among the most artistically adventurous and innovative arts institutions in the U.S. Under the artistic direction of Michael Tilson Thomas since 1995, the Orchestra is a leading presence among American orchestras at home and around the world, celebrated for its artistic excellence, creative performance concepts, active touring, award-winning recordings, and standard-setting education programs. In December 2018, the San Francisco Symphony announced Esa-Pekka Salonen as its Music Director Designate. Salonen will begin his appointment as the SFS’s 12th Music Director in September 2020, at which time Michael Tilson Thomas will become the Orchestra’s first Music Director Laureate, following his remarkable 25-year tenure as Music Director.
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The San Francisco Symphony presents more than 220 concerts and presentations annually for an audience of nearly 450,000 in its home of Davies Symphony Hall and through its active national and international touring. A cornerstone of the organization’s mission, the San Francisco Symphony’s education programs are the most extensive offered by any American orchestra today, providing free comprehensive music education to every first- through fifth-grade student in the San Francisco public schools, and serving more than 100,000 children, students, educators, and families annually. The SFS has won such recording awards as France’s Grand Prix du Disque and Britain’s GramophoneAward, as well as 15 Grammy Awards. In 2004, the SFS launched the multimedia Keeping Score on PBS-TV and the web. In 2014, the SFS inaugurated SoundBox, a new experimental performance venue and music series located backstage at Davies Symphony Hall. SFS radio broadcasts, the first in the nation to feature symphonic music when they began in 1926, today carry the Orchestra’s concerts across the country.
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About Frost Amphitheater and Stanford Live
Frost Amphitheater, located at 351 Lasuen St. in Stanford’s arts district, will reopen in the spring of 2019 with a diverse lineup of concerts and events presented by Stanford Live. An extensive renovation of the 1937 built Frost Amphitheater includes a state-of-the-art stage and back-of-house amenities, as well as improved and greater accessibility for audience members. Renovations were carefully planned to maintain the essence and the sense of place that characterizes this treasured venue.
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Stanford Live presents a wide range of the finest performances from around the world fostering a vibrant learning community and providing distinctive experiences through the performing arts. With its home at Bing Concert Hall, Stanford Live is simultaneously a public square, a sanctuary and a lab, drawing on the breadth and depth of Stanford University to connect performance to the significant issues, ideas and discoveries of our time.
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2019 SF SYMPHONY AT FROST, PRESENTED BY STANFORD LIVE
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All concerts take place at Frost Amphitheater, Stanford University, 351 Lasuen St. in Stanford’s arts district
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Tickets for the July 10, 13, and 14 Frost Amphitheater performances by the San Francisco Symphony will be available for sale to SF Symphony donors and subscribers on February 19, 2019 at 10 am, and to the general public on February 26, 2019 at 10 am viawww.sfsymphony.org/frost , (415) 864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, located on Grove Street between Franklin and Van Ness. Lawn tickets: $30 ($15 for kids under 18), Reserved seats start at $75.
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